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at the white house just over three weeks ago. a state department official said today the u.s. was disappointed that israel allowed the building moratorium to expire. u.s. official middle east envoy george mitchell heads back to the region tomorrow with stops in israel and ramallah. both sides have accepted an invitation to resume talks in paris next month. >> ifill: for more on what's holding these talks together so far, we turn to ghaith al-omari, the advocacy director for the american task force on palestine, and a former advisor to president abbas. and david makovsky, senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy and the co-author of "myths, illusions, and peace." for let's talk about myths, illusions and peace, gait al on ari. what happened today. why didn't the palestinians walk away from the table as they promised they would if the settlements were not frozen. >> because they realized that the price of walking out from the talks is very high s very high from a domestic strategic perspective. ultimately they have no choice. and if you want to get a palestinian state the o
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. the u.s. treasury and insurance giant a.i.g. unveiled a plan today to speed up the repayment of more than $100 billion in federal bailout money. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, economic writers louise story of the "new york times" and roben farzad of "bloomberg business week" weigh the pluses and minuses of the deal. >> brown: then, kwame holman looks at the down-to-the-wire scramble as congress pushed to adjourn just weeks ahead of the midterm elections. >> suarez: judy woodruff talks to speaker of the house nancy pelosi about the battle over tax cuts and the stakes for democrats in november. >> our members left congress last night. they are confident that they would return in the majority. >> brown: special correspondent miles o'brien reports on a mississippi community's plan to use stimulus money for mass transit in rural areas. >> suarez: betty ann bowser updates the johnson and johnson story as company executives and the f.d.a. come under fire on capitol hill fo
to get their agenda through. they said don't run away from us yet. we're eight weeks away from election day. you see a lot of democrats in very tough districts really starting to put distance between themselves and the national democrats, president obama, speaker pelosi. >> lehrer: you also believe looking further at those polls about dissatisfaction with government. there's stuff in there that needs to be noted as well, correct some. >> awe-i have looked all year long. it's this volatility, almost anger that exists inside the electorate. take a look at these numbers because this is fascinating when you look at it through history. today 78% of respondents say tler dissatisfied or angry with government and how government works versus 22% who are satisfied or enthusiastic. compare that, jim, to november 1994. you remember bill clinton was president. newt gingrich, the republican revolution and the takeover of the house of representatives, you are seeing more dissatisfaction and anger in the electorate now than you did when republicans won 54 seats and took over the house. >> lehrer: now t
audible on wall street today, and in the offices of many u.s. banks. not only are the new capital standards looser than expected, but there's nearly a ten-year phase-in-- considered an eternity in the marketplace. experts say the so-called basel 3 requirements eliminate some uncertainty for financial stock investors, who were worried the rules would be tougher. k.b.w.'s fred cannon says, more importantly, they should help banks do business more cautiously. >> it means that there is risk retention for the banks. if they make a loan or do a mortgage securitization or subprime loan, they are going to have to take some risk and hold it on their balance sheet. and, that's a good thing because that's clearly one of the issues that got us into trouble a couple of years ago. >> reporter: some experts also believe the new capital standards will result in the return of juicy dividends, something that's been missing since the financial crisis unfolded. >> the banks have been precluded from paying dividends because they didn't know what capital needed to be, and they had to keep it all. now w
but it really was an opportunity for us to try something new and better for our patients. >> lehrer: gwen ifill has a conversation with online editor and liberal commentator arianna huffington on her new book about the declining middle class. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks with composer and musician herbie hancock, whose 70th birthday tour fuses jazz with global beats. >> taking what happens and trying to make it work. that's something i add life >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your
, it's going to make us stronger, as if he operates in a parallel universe that bears no relation to reality. >> charlie: as you suggested to me earlier, you have never seen a head of state that you think is prepared to say more untruths? >> i have never in my life seen a head of state look an interviewer in the eye -- look the camera straightforward and lie about something he knows the international community has been filled about the stories -- the story of the stoning. he said, "no one has been accused -- condemned to stoning in iran." for three weeks, that was the top of the news inside and iran and outside iran. he looked into the camera and he said, "i am the head of state, i say no one was stoned, end of story." >> charlie, whenever i watch ahmadinejad doing interviews, i am reminded of a famous "seinfeld" episode where george costanza asked the secret of lying and george said to jerry "it's not a lie if you believe it" and sometimes i think ahmadinejad is delusional, he believes that iran is the freest country in the world, he believes it has an incredibly prosperous econo
and c.e.o. gary kelley. my first question: why did you do the deal? >> first of all, airtran brings us a number of things. they have a safe low cost high quality operation. they have a strong low fare brand. but most importantly, it provides us an opportunity to expand our route network. they fly places that we don't. we have very little overlapping routes. but notably, their largest operation is in atlanta. and we have no service to atlanta at all, as one example. it brings us more access to new york's laguardia airport, as well as first-time access for us to reagan national airport in washington d.c.. >> susie: where kelly, why did you do it now? >> i feel like we're ready now. first of all, things are so much better today than they were a year ago. our profit outlook is solid. we have plenty of cash on hand. we have a very strong balance sheet, with credit rating agencies affirming our credit rating today. so financially we're very well prepared for this. we also have a very strong leadership team. who is ready to add this major task to our list. and then we have the tools in place
's collapse and the ensuing crisis led to a new push to make banks safer. in the u.s. a sweeping financial reform bill signed into law in july imposed stricter capital requirements on banks, yet largely left u.s. regulators to determine those levels. now new international standards may be on the way. this weekend in basil, switzerland, central bankers from 27 countries including ben bernanke agreed to new rules that included substantially raising amount of capital that banks must hold in reserve. banks in the u.s. currently must hold about 2% of their assets in capital or equity to absorb losses in the event of runs or financial panics. under the so-called basil-3 agreement the new international standard would be 7% of assets. but banks would have until 2019 to implement it. the head of the european central bank said the move would help protect against another meltdown. >> what we have decided is commensurate to permit when we have all the standards in place to make the banking sector at a global level much more resilient. and i would say we think we are commensurate to the shocks that we
collapsed under its own way. it would have been used by thousands of pedestrians as they walked over to the main venue. now questions are being raised over the quality of construction. it was not meant to be this way. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing a global showcase. >> it is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entire renovation and cleaning. >> but not everyone is convinced. some say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference. that is not moving news in itself, but this one is north korea, and it is extremely rare. the last time it happened 30 years ago, it led to kim jong-il succeeding his father. there is insulation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. -- there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. >> this is an early confirmed photo of the sun, taken almost two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from a ruthless bloodline. the eternal president and his son kim jon
. >> the policies that the republicans have offer -- are offering right now are the exact policies that got us into this mess. >> i think it just shows how out of touch the white house is. the american people are asking the question, where are the jobs? >> over the coming midterm election. >> what i'm going to remind the american people of is the policies that we have put in place have moved us in the right direction. >> no apologies for opposing the stimulus, no apologies for opposing the health care. no apologies for opposing what they call the wall street bill. gwen: and a sensational and distracting threat from an obscure florida pastor. >> we are simply burning a book. >> it doesn't in any way represent america or americans or american government or american religious or political leadership. >> we have to make sure that we don't start turning on each other. gwen: we'll put the roller coaster week in context with jackie calmes of "the new york times," david wessel of "the wall street journal" and michael duffy of "time" magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis. covering history a
why she left islam. >> i would never use the expression anti-islamic sentiment. i think it's more precise to distinguish between political islam on the one hand and religious islam and spiritual islam. and i have seen, yes, a growing knowledge on political islam, a growing interest in political islam, and a growing condemnation of political islam by more and more americans. i find both american men and women audiences that i speak condemn practices in the name of islam against women, the forced veiling of women, forced marriages of women, the guardian principle. there have been some eye-catching stories, for instance the 18-year old yemeni girl who was married off to an 80-year old man and who managed to escape that. so there is condemnation of these practices and there is condemnation of honor killings, condemnation of female genital mutilation. that is not a command in the koran, but in some obscure hadith, but practiced widely in muslim countries and among muslim immigrants to the u.s. >> so, does the thing that ms. a alreadyi mention done against women who are muslim cause som
a victory in thursday's u.s. senate republican primary in delaware. she now faces the general election 40 days from now. o'donnell is single, 42 years old with a background in public relations. previously she sought the republican nomination for u.s. senate during the 2006 primaries. four years ago. and she lost. in 2008, two years ago, she gained the uncontested republican nomination for the u.s. senate in the general election, challenging city senator joe biden. biden won by 457,000 to o'donnell's 140,000. biden outspent o'donnell $4.9 million, to o'donnell's $116,000. nearly 32 times 2 times bigger o'donnell's budget. her opponent for the 2010 republican primary for the u.s. senate was michael castle, a nine-and former two-term governor of delaware. >> don't ever understint the power of we, the people. >> two months ago she had no money, no campaign, and many believed in no chance. with a 23% approval rating, she looked like a long shot against the household name of michael castle. but the palin endorsement led to a $600,000 pledge to the o'donnell campaign by the tea party. even after
our behavior. when faced with a tough decision we rely on our emotions somewhat to help guide us. last month, we talked about positive emotions such as reward and pleasure. tonight we turn to fear and anxiety. human have evolved to feel fear in response to danger and to exhibit aggression when threatened. today fear and aggression can be found throughout the animal kingdom. by studying these emotions in animals, we may one day learn how to control violent behavior in ourselves. last month we discussed how the brap's pleasure circuits are corrupted by addiction. this evening we will learn how the brain's fear circuits go awry in clinical syndromes of fear such as chronic anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. human anxiety disorders are some of the most common mental illnesss in the country. nearly one-third of all americans will exhibit symptoms of an anxiety disorder at least once during his or her lifetime. post-traumatic stress disorder's also becoming more prevalent. more than 40,000 war veterans are currently affected by this illness with thousands more cases going unreported
, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the president accused the republicans of being fiscally irresponsible, but admitted that his own policies have not worked as quickly as hoped. congressional correspondent kwame holman reports. >> we got some business to do today. >> reporter: just eight weeks from election day, the president made his pitch in cleveland today to help the sputtering u.s. economy >> that means making long-term investments in education and clean energy; in basic research, technology, and infrastructure. >> reporter: and he also took a stand against extending the bush era tax cuts for the top 2% of earners, setting up a pre- election fight with republicans in congress. he accused the g.o.p. of being mr. obama repeatedl
. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. has set a one-year target for getting a framework peace agreement. u.s. troops joined iraqi forces today, in a raid in fallujah, the former insurgent stronghold. they were searching for a senior al-qaeda operative. it was unclear if he was one of the six people killed. earlier this week, american units fought in a two-day battle with al-qaeda militants. u.s. forces officially ended their combat role on september first, but they can still take part in operations, if the iraqis ask for help. in afghanistan, police fired into the air to disperse hundreds of protesters just outside kabul. at least one person was killed and 45 others wounded. the protesters were demonstrating against scattered burnings of the koran in the u-s last weekend. most of the injuries came from ricocheting bullets. police said the taliban are using the rallies to incite violence, ahead of next week's elections. lawmakers in france voted today to raise the retirement age to 62 to stem losses in the pension system. the national assembly, the lower house of the french parliament, approved sweeping ret
economy. his speech in cleveland, ohio highlighted his administration's plans for tax cuts. the u.s. secretary of state has said mexico's struck cartels increasingly look like an -- mexico's drug cartels increasingly look like an insurgency. the army was deployed against the cartels in 2006. the father of britain's prime minister has died. david cameron is the difference on the news that his father had suffered a stroke on holiday. he reached the hospital just before his father died. a russian passenger plane carrying 81 has crash landed, but all on board are uninjured. the jet was on its way to moscow when the power supply, fuel pump, and radio and navigation all failed. the jet came to rest safely in a nearby forest. hundreds of prisoners have escaped from a local jail in central nigeria as a gang of armed men attacked it. authorities are blaming a radical islamist sect. we have this report. >> police are hunting between 700 men and 800 men on the run. the gunmen who attacked the jail went from cell to cell, using bolt cutters, then setting fire to the building. intelligence indic
. he now has a best-selling autobiography, "open." his thoughts on the u.s. open and other topics in our conversation, coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always pleased to have andre agassi on the program. he became the only man in history to win all four grand slam titles and an olympic gold medal. his best-selling autobiography is out now, "open." to not take long for this to get on the list as well. >> i guess not. it has been quite a year. tavis: would be mean about that? >> the feedback. this came with risks, but my hope was that those who chose
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
. and tom baker, consumer editor for ktvu channel 2 news. we'll begin with you, tom. tell us what you can about the explosion that shook all of us yesterday. >> it is a remarkable failure because it really shouldn't happen, given all of the protocols in place and all the things that happened to have such a fail-year you wonder. with such a catastrophic failure somebody punched a hole in one of these mains and caused a spark but that doesn't appear to be the case here. something failed in such a catastrophic way that the valves are maybe a mile, two miles apart so now all of this highly compressed gas which is under several hundred pounds of pressure per square inch is venting to the atmosphere. it catches on fire. it becomes a blow torch. it has to work out and while that was happening it was burning up that particular neighborhood. generally speaking, we don't know really what happened. we know there was a significant failure and generally speaking has been my experience in covering all kinds of disasters it's a chain of events rather than a single event but there is plenty going on that
help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment, " one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and with contributions by viewers like you. thank you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: i am sorry. yes, you can keep rolling. i am trying to introduce the coach, and i got distracted, so let me do the introduction first, and then i will come back to this ring, and i think when you see this, you will understand for the first time what i was distracted. he is a coach with in the orleans saints. just months after hurricane katrina, he knew he was getting into something much bigger than sports, and he led the saints to their first super bowl victory against the colts. it helped lift the spirits of those there. his new book is called "home team: coaching the saints and new orleans back to life," in his book is about to make its debut, as you might imagine, on "the new york ti
cry from 1994's "contract with america," and the grand signing ceremony on the steps of the u.s. capitol. today, house republican leaders appeared in shirt sleeves at a hardware and lumber store in suburban virginia 30 miles from capitol hill with this year's policy prescriptions. minority leader john boehner and his top lieutenants spelled out their central point. >> government is out of control in washington, and we need to rein it in, and begin a new drive for a smaller, less costly and more accountable government in our nation's capital. these are the things that the american people are demanding, >> reporter: while the backdrop has changed, republicans hope their document, called "a pledge to america," will produce similar results to 1994. that year's plan helped the party gain 54 seats and take the house majority for the first time in 40 years. one of the main architects of the 2010 version is california's kevin mccarthy. he accused democrats of ignoring the country's wishes. >> from the billion dollar bailouts to the stimulus package that failed to stimulate, to the gover
by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a little tension between the two of you. >> no tensio
through literature and you can find out by talking. and you can find out by using your imagination. and for an appelate judge that's important. because when you're in that room, as you are, and writing and reading, what you are goinging to write is going to affect other people. so it's very important to have the imagination to try to understand how your opinions and your decisions will affect the lives of others. >> rose: why are things that you read like literature important to a judge? >> i told a group of undergraduates here in new york a few weeks ago when i was asked that question. and i said it's like knowing a foreign language or reading a novel. we only have one life. and we only really know our own. but by reading novels and by reading what other people have written about life, and about different ways of living, you can lead more lives than your own. and you can understand how people could have lived a quite different life. and that's a wonderful privilege to be able to do that as well as i think a necessity for someone whose's goinging to affect the lives of other people
think is good news, but it means that it may linger over us for longer than we thought, which means more rain. >> sreenivasan: and in massachusetts, governor deval patrick warned against under-rating the storm. >> the public should continue to take precautions-- stay indoors and off the roads during the height of the storm. exercise extreme caution this afternoon when winds pick up. >> sreenivasan: out on the bay state's coast, inmates from the plymouth county jail shoveled and stacked sandbags. nearly 400 out-of-state utility crews were staged and ready. but as earl kept moving, officials up and down the coast hoped to salvage tourist revenue through labor day weekend. another bombing in pakistan has killed 54 people. it happened in quetta in the southwest, the latest in a series of such attacks. a suicide bomber targeted shiites staging a pro- palestinian rally and procession through the city. police said 160 people were wounded. the pakistani taliban claimed responsibility, and a spokesman claimed the group will launch attacks in america and europe very soon. in afghanistan, the u.s.
has a 9.7% unemployment, just pretty much neck and neck with the u.s. rate. and that's because san francisco has some strong job centers for all the new happening web 2.0 or maybe even web 3.0 industries. that's sort of where people want to be. the east bay, alameda and contra costa, are still in the 11% range. that's where the biggest housing bubble was here, and they just have not recovered. silicon valley, santa clara is slowly recovering. we're seeing some manufacturing and other jobs come back there. but that's been a little slower. >> but you feel better already now that the statisticians have told us the recession actually ended a year ago. >> oh, yeah, cheered everybody up. all those people standing in the unemployment lines were really heartened to hear that news. >> but to your point about this being a house, most le a housing-led recession, does that mean, do you think, that we have or have not sort of permanently inherited the mantle of the rust belt states, that always we're the first down and the last up when there's a recession? >> yeah, i don't think that's necessar
. to make sure iraq is an effective partner with us. >> this is not yet a country of peace, and it may not be for a long time. after seven years of violence, it is a country that feels itself to be free once again. the acting prime minister, nouri al maliki, announced today that iraq was once more sovereign and independent. the point of the american involvement here, supposedly, was to liberate the iraqi people and perhaps to start a domino effect against other middle eastern dictatorships. all that really happened as a result of the invasion in the short run was saddam hussein was overthrown and the whole country was laid waste. the invasion took power away from the minority sunni moslems and gave it to the shi'a majority. >> it was essentially a disaster. the worst disaster. >> worse than saddam himself? >> definitely worse than saddam. >> the military campaign was devastating. political fallout was marred by carelessness and lack of interest. president bush, shortly before the invasion, seems not to know that iraq was split into sunni and shi'a. his secretary of defense dumped a len
is an example of what we are up against. >> benjamin netanyahu thanked the u.s. president for his efforts and described the talks says "open and productive." >> id president's statement is an expression of our -- i think the president's statement is an expression of our determination to fight and you have talks that are open, productive, and serious in the quest for peace, also centered around the need for security arrangements that are able to roll back this kind of terror and threats to security. and that is a fundamental element, an important foundation of the peace we seek, and i appreciate, mr. president, your efforts to advance this beast -- peace for us and our neighbors and, i think we can say, the world. >> mr. obama also welcomed the leaders of the palestinian and the israelis. king abdullah and other leaders will join the talks. but is there it now and new commitment to achieve peace? our correspondent reports from the west bank on what are the unresolved tensions. >> on a hill overlooking the city of jerusalem, hundreds of jewish settlers came to bury the dead. the symmetry is
anniversary of farm aid. we are glad you joined us. >> all i know is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us live better. >> with every question and every answer, nationwide is proud to join tapis in working to remove obstacles to empowerment one obstacle at a time. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from the words like you. thank you. -- from viewers like you. ed thank you -- thank you. >> i am pleased to welcome norah jones to this program. she is on tour in support of her most recent cd. you can pick up a copy of her next project, a copy of many collective collaborations, and on october 2, she will be in milwaukee with an all-star lineup to celebrate the 25th anniversary of farmaid. before we get to that, here is the video from the song, "chasing pirates." >> ♪ and i do not know how to slow it down ♪ ♪ my mind is racing and ♪ i am chasing pirates ♪ my mind is racing, i am chasing pirates ♪ ♪ my mind is racing, i am chasing pirates ♪ >> we were chatting about tamoxifen time vs.
this chance for peace. as the u.s. combat mission in iraq comes to an end, the american vice-president says baghdad is close to a new government. no regrets from tony blair about his decision to send british troops to invade iraq. very warm welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers in the states on pbs and also around the globe, with me, peter dobbie. coming up later for you -- how your name and postcode can affect your chances of getting a job in france. and new pictures of the world's most famous ship wreck -- the titanic in 3-d. the u.s. president barack obama has urged israelis and palestinians not to let slip an opportunity for peace that he says may not soon return. he made the remark as he opened a landmark peace talks. our middle east editor jeremy bowen reports from washington. >> if it feels as though they have all been this way before. an american president, and israeli prime minister, launching a new attempt at middle east peace in fact -- -- these at the white house and condemning bloodshed. >> there are going to be those who do everything they can to undermine the
. but the australian people told us in no uncertain terms on that day and the days that followed is this -- that we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> the election august 21 ended in deadlock. neither julia gillard nor tony abbott's liberal coalition succeeded in forming a government. the arithmetic was not balanced. yesterday, it was neck and neck. do you get right -- julia gillard had 74 seats. tony abbott had 73. first, a vote for tony abbott, giving both sides 74 seats. but then the but -- two for julia gillard. last week, the opposition leader tony abbott described himself as the head of the government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede. >> the coalition won more seats than our opponents, but sadly, we did not get the opportunity to form a government. >> there has not been a hung parliament here since the second world war. australians are used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more for agile and raises the question -- how long will it last? nick bryant, bbc news, sydney. >> and six months after their election in iraq, still no government. gab
about who the oil company blames and there is an interactive timeline detailing how the u.s. came to suffer its worst environmental disaster. moving around the globe now, hundreds of prisoners escaped from a jail in nigeria when armed men attacked it. authorities blamed the radical islamists sect boko haram. we have this report. police and art -- >> police are hunting men who attacked and jail. begun and it went from cell to cell, using bolt cutters, then setting fire to the building. the authorities say intelligent man -- intelligence indicates it is the work of boko haram, a radical islamists sect blindly opposed to western education. 100 other members were awaiting trial for their part in a riot last year. back then, more than 100 were killed, and the group's leader was shot dead in police custody after a siege of his camp out. -- compound. they have headquarters in the capital. but there has been unrest, too, in other states in the northwest of the country boko haram -- of the country. boko haram want the enactment of strict islamist law. it is feared that boko haram are embra
accent. ♪ >> hello. the violence was filled by a tv report ave koran is acquitted in the u.s., but demonstrations and killed at least 18 people in kashmir and have anchor at the indian government. police opened fire after thousands of people took to the streets chanting anti-indian and anti-western slogans. here is the report. >> more funerals, more a year, and more killings. on the most violent day of the violent summer in indian- administered kashmir. once again, tens of thousands of people took to the streets on defiance of a strict curfews. they chanted pro-independence slogans and anti-india. more than 70 people have been shot dead by the police in the last three months during similar angry protests. this time, there was a twist. these demonstrators gathered to denounce reports the copies of the koran had been damaged in the united states. the christian missionary school was attacked. in that delhi, the united states condemned the violence, and anyone in america who insulted the koran. >> i strongly condemn such acts as disrespectful, and tolerant, davis of, and unrepres
by the creator of "the shield." >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> nationwide is on your side >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: frank luntz is a vessel and author whose books include "words that work" and "what americans really want . . . really." good to have you back on this program. the president. in milwaukee earlier in the week on labor day -- jobs, jobs, jobs. ohio later in the week -- jobs, jobs, jobs. we will come later to the conversation about john boehner. what about this populist rhetoric of jobs? >> i do not understand how he got distracted with the mosque. i do not understand how he does the white house speech on iraq and afghanistan. the american people have to focuses in mind -- jobs and the debt. it is still hard to believe that only 50 days left between now and the election, how things could have gone
jailed in teheran, about today's release and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions a
there on inauguration day. all the media attention. >> rose: 200,000 in germany. >> right. and so it's us. we're going to run the country. and so i don't think they understood the anxiety the country was feeling. i don't think they understood the post excess moment that we were going through and are still going through, of people feelinging that we've-- we've squandered things. we've overspent. we've spoiled ourselves. we haven't behaved responsibly. >> rose: we've lost something that is important to have, some quality that we had that made us as a country who we are. >> right. >> and a turn point which is forgotten. i guess the pastor he name was platt. >> david platt was a pastor at a megachurch and he said megachurches are too commercial, consumer christianity. we have to 3u8 back. and he is not the first to say that but he is part of it this moment where people are redefining what socially acceptable, the billing car, the hummer, that's no longer socially acceptable and it's part of i think a big cultural change, caused by the recession but caused by the sense that we haven't been responsible, tha
. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: a few programming notes first. in just a few minutes, i will be joined by a the huffington post co-founder arianna huffington, and tomorrow, we have a team robbins and the plea he has written about the jamestown settlement. later in the week, philip seymour hoffman, who is making his directorial debut. on thursday night, the "house" star hugh laurie is here, and then we revisit a documentary on baseball. tonight, we begin our week with kathleen sebelius, former governor of kansas, the now, of course, serves as president obama note's secretary of health and human services -- serves as president obama's health and human services
commonwealth games but the bbc for minister tells us that his country will be ready. >> conducted according to international standards. >> deeply divided over afghanistan, the new book that is embarrassing president obama. welcome to bbc world news. coming up later for you, 30 years from the start of the iran of rock war, we look back at the -- iran -- iran and iraq war, we look back at the bloody generation. are the issues that you wear footing you in danger on the open road -- are the issues -- are the shoes that you wear putting you in danger on the open road? negotiators from six countries are arguing with each other at a major conference in moscow. the scramble has come center stage. the arctic holds vast untapped fields of oil and gas, becoming more accessible as global warming melts more and more arctic ice. russia is claiming almost half of a million square miles of extra territory. several others have staked a claim. the moscow conference is intended to build cooperation but the competition is so fierce, some people fear another cold war. >> a record breaking voyage through the shr
difficulties or challenges which might come from the mineral development, this would be the issue for us. >> rose: china and mongolia next. words alone aren't enough. our job is to listen and find ways to help workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep restoring the jobs, tourist beaches, and businesses impacted by the spill. we've paid over $400 million in claims and set up a $20 billion independently-run claims fund. i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. i'm gonna be here until we make this right. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tung chee hwa is here. he is the chairman of the china united states exchange foundation. it aims to build greater understanding between the world's two largest economies. he is the former chief executive of hong kong, he has a long, close tie with the chinese leadership. he is currently vice chairman of the national committee of the chinese people's political consultant conference, the mainland's top political advisory body. i am very please
more buyers in the u.s. last month. sales rose 15% as it continues to see its american business grow. i went today to a mercedes dealership in union, new jersey, to find out what's driving those robust sales. it's an alphabet of success stories. "c" class, "e" class, "s" class, and even the s.l.s. no matter which mercedes it is, consumers are driving off with these luxury sedans. sales of the new e-class models are up 71% so far this year, and-- for all mercedes vehicles sold in the u.s.-- up more than 22%. the c.e.o. of mercedes u.s.a. expects business for the german automaker will stay in the fast lane. >> i think we'll be able to keep that pace. we were hoping for a little bit of an increase, but we're happy if it stays on that level. there is a good chance it will. but we'll have to wait and see what september brings. >> susie: ernst, in this type economy, how is it consumers can buy a new car, let alone a mercedes. >> i think a lot of people are at the point where they do need a new car. they're hesitant, but they need it, and they're looking around and looking for good value and n
? the country's treasury sold its own currency, the yen, and bought u.s. dollars. the idea is to drive down the value of the yen versus the dollar, making japan's currency cheaper. >> wolfgang koester is the c.i.a. at a firm that. welcome back to "nightly business report." what companies do you think get hurt by this japanese yen intervention? >> the people that are going to get hurt are the people that are looking to -- that have costs in japan, more than the people that are looking at the revenues. what is really important is for corporations and their investors to understand where the corporations have the exposures on the revenue, as well as the costs. for example, net exposure side. >> tom: so when you're talking about the cost side, these are companies that have some kind of manufacturing or services based in japan that could get hurt by this intervention, right? >> precisely. that's absolutely correct. that's what we're seeing at fireapps. we're seeing companies coming and looking and trying to see how this yen appreciation impacts them, and there is a focus on the second part of thi
is probably behind us. the concern about a double dip is over and that now we should take advantage of the favorable seasonals in particular now that the mid term elections will soon be over. >> tom: the blue chips surge nearly 200 points, closing out a fourth straight week to the upside. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 24. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. the bulls are back on wall street. tom, investors were enthusiastic on some encouraging economic news: orders in august for things like machinery and computers were stronger than expected. >> tom: susie, this is the fourth week in a row that the major stock averages were positive and in a big way. let's run down the numbers from today's action. the dow jumped almost 200 points. the nasdaq added 54 and the s&p 500 rose 24. those indexes were up roughly 2% eac
was the chief architect of the financial global crisis that is still hurting the u.s. and last year's $787 billion stimulous program was largely summer's idea and he defended it. >> i think the stimulous had a significant impact. tens and thousands of teachers and cops across the country. $53billion delivered to american families. 3,000 projects underway that the calculations suggest that its impact is only going to increase. that we are also seeing 200,000 mortgages have been relieved. it's going to be 500,000 by november 1. i think we are on the right track. >> dr. summers is the third high profile member of president obama's economic team to quit before the end of the president's first two years in office. budget director, peter orszag was the first to leave in july. christina roma was next. the white house is also expecting rahm emanuel to leave the use to run for mayor of chicago. >> if rahm emanuel leaves, he will be the fourth of president obama's closest advisers to have left since july. question, after 20 months, is this presidential staff turnover normal? pat buchanan. >> thi
the explorer in all of us. >> and now "bbc news night." >> facing execution, the british woman on death row for a crime she says she did not commit. campaigners say the case against -- the u.k. government once a retrial. >> what is life like in here? >> hellish. it is a nightmare. it is a place you don't want to be. >> and the novel about the fear of death of a soldier son completed as his own son was killed in combat. >> in my place rooted in my country with borders that are acknowledged by the arab countries neighboring s and international community. >> since the u.s. supreme court lifted a ban on the death penalty in 1976 there have more than 1200 executions in the u.s. in texas, a state where more than one-third of u.s. executions have taken place, a british woman could be put to death for a crime she says she did not commit. campaigners for linda say her original trial was flawed and her lawyers are pressing for a retrial. peter marshall has been to texas to meet her. ♪ ♪ [singing "amazing grace"] >> death row texas, the state with the busiest execution chamber. since the bet kelse
to start rebuilding. we want to make everything clean and tidy. we are asking the government to help us. >> but the numbers are overwhelming. at last count, 18.6 million people have been affected, and losses could exceed 28 billion pounds. the government has promised initial payment of 120 pounds. the 13-year-old wants to be a doctor. she and all these children are living in classrooms next door. they and their families will be homeless again soon when school starts. >> let's round of some other main news. he said he made a mistake in accusing syria of assassinating his father. he was killed in 2005. he describes his words as a political accusation made too quickly. syria has always denied involvement. rescue teams have resumed their search for survivors of mud slide. authorities say 44 people have died. thousands more are at risk of flooding and landslides. south african trade unions have suspended their strike. more than 1 million civil servants will see the pay rise. union members say they will consider the latest offer. the spanish government has dismissed a cease-fire as insufficie
in the philippines. did police shoot some victims. a new band of brothers of the u.s. troops surge in afghanistan peaks. are we finally saying goodbye to the super skinny models? the pastor of a small church in florida has been planning to burn a copy of the koran. he now says he has called off the protest. they say a deal has been raised to move the center away from ground zero. the organizers have denied any such agreement, but here is what the pastor had to say. >> i will be flying out there on saturday to meet at the ground zero mosque. he has agreed to move the location. that cannot happen overnight, but he has agreed to move that. we felt that would be a sign that god wants us to do that. the american people do not want the mosque there, and muslims do not want us to burn the chiron -- karan. we have agreed to cancel our event, and saturday i will be flying of there to meet with him. >> pasteur jones making that statement. this story gets no less bizarre or confusing. >> let's try to break this down in what we know if the moment. he made the statement that he had been looking for a sign fro
gathered to denounce reports that copies of the koran was burned in the u.s. in delhi, the u.s. condemned the violence and anyone in america who insulted the koran. >> i strongly condemn that such acts as disrespectful and unrepresentative of american values. the deliberate destruction of any holy book is a horrible act. >> but kashmir is an indian challenge. the prime minister with military commanders is deeply distressed by the latest violence. but this government seems powerless to stop it. kashmir has been divided between india and pakistan for more than six decades. it remains a dangerous tension in south asia and a rallying cry for asian militants. mylan unrest has implications for stability and india and pakistan and further appeals in afghanistan. >> the man behind the controversial plans for muslim community center near ground zero has said extremists of any faith must not be allowed to hijack this course. the imam says it's vital to have a platform where the voice of moderate muslims can be amplified. many americans are opposed to the center. >> in recent weeks the imam has trie
the dangers of secularism on his first state visit to britain. the human cost of the u.s. financial downturn as poverty levels rise to their highest level for nearly 50 years. e.u. summit row as president sarkozy lashing out against critics and vows to clear out illegal roma camps. >> french men and women have to know that this policy will continue while strictly abiding by the letter and spirit of our republican law. >> welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later, women in a man's world, the dangers of being a female candidate in afghanistan's election. and pakistan's hindus river may be flowing, but not international aid. the u.n. appeals for more money. hello, it is the first state visit by a pope to britain since the 16th century when henry viii broke from rome and formed the anglican church. the pope has been forced to acknowledge failings over pedophile priests and issued a warning about the dangers of what he calls aggressive secularism in britain. we look at an occasion that matches protocol with religious fervor. >> i
reporter in washington for as -- bob woodward is still making waves. >> our reporter in washington for us. let's go to new york with our correspondent. barbara, even in a time of austerity, the u.s. has to live up to its aid and given the responsibilities, but he seems to want nothing less than an entirely new responsibilities -- has to live up to its aid and other responsibilities, but he seems to want nothing less than new responsibilities. >> this is a much broader theme that it involves, trade policy and investment policy and things like that. instead of food aid, for instance, he might invest in the agricultural sector, and some have welcomed this more structural approach to trying to stop poverty, but it is said that president obama did not commit any new money to the millennium development goals, even though america is very bar behind -- far behind the goals it set tenures ago. >> barbara, -- the goals it set 10 years ago. >> barbara, what about this new role? >> i think what he is going to be tried to do is have a result -- he is going to be trying to have a new result. rather tha
the economy, but the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us to a showdown. the only thing that can make them budget is a showdown. >> that may force the government to make further concessions, but two-thirds of the country are resigned to reforms already approved by the lower house. with the senate vote looking to be a formality, president sarkozy has the upper hand. christian fraser, bbc news, paris. >> our economy has started to shrink again. it came out of recession earlier this year. dee dee was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year -- gdp was down by 1.2%. youtube and its owner, googles, have one of landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. the court ruled it was the responsibility of the copyright owner to tell googol -- google that their property appeared on the youtube. the suspension of of controversial diabetes drugcontroversialavandia. -- controversial diabetes drug, avandia. it is linked to an increased risk of heart failure. it was supposed to be a showcase moment for india, showing itself to be a global power.
the country would say, "we're not there yet." if the election is about the policies that are going to move us forward versus the policies that will get us back into a mess, then i think the democrats will do very well. >> holman: one such policy is mr. obama's push to extend middle-class tax cuts, something he argued should garner bipartisan support. >> 97% of americans make less than $250,000 a year... $250,000 a year or less. and i'm saying we can give those families-- 97%-- permanent tax relief. now, that seems like a common- sense thing to do. and what i've got is the republicans holding middle-class tax relief hostage because they're insisting we've got to give tax relief to millionaires and billionaires to the tune of about $100,000 per millionaire, >> holman: on health care, the president was pressed about a government report showing health care costs on the rise. that, despite the passage of legislation aimed at bending down the cost curve. >> we didn't think that we were going to cover 30 million people for free, but that the long-term trend, in terms of how much the average family i
for education reform and health care reform. it allows us to move forward and get things done on energy and what we want most is... help our economy to start to thrive and grow and innovate again. >> rose: we conclude this evening with laird hamilton, the extraordinary surfer, and susan casey, the author of a book called "the wave: in pursuit of the rogues, freaks, and giants of the ocean." >> the planet is mostly ocean and life comes from the ocean. and so one of the things i really aim to do with my writing is to take people into these places and show them the incredible majesty and in some cases the fear and in some cases the wackiness. but there's, like, a parallel universe. and it's in our world that we live in. how often do we see it. >> and if you part patriot, then you'll appreciate, then you'll revere. so all of those things i think are so critical in what needs to happen for the ocean. we need these books, we need these waves, we need people to be in awe of them maybe at first, to participate in activities and then ultimately be pro active in trying to protect the ocean. >> rose: melod
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: today's vote in the u.s. senate means the ban on gays in the military will stand, at least for now. opponents of the ban fell four votes short today in their bid to break a filibuster. >> the vote was about whether to begin debating a military budget bill. it includeded language calling for repeal of don't ask don't tell. but the republican filibuster held and the measure stayed stalled at a vote of 56-43. >> the motion is not agreed to. >> lehrer: 60 votes were needed. it came down to a handful of senators including maine republican susan collins. she backs repeal of the 17-year-old ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, but she opposed a limit on amendments. >> i think we should welcome the service of these individuals who are willing and capable of serving their country. but i cannot vote to proceed to this bill under a situation that is going to shut down the debate and preclude republican amendments. that too is not fair. >> lehrer: it was clear that most republicans opposed repeal of don't as
you could join us. >> all i know is his name is james. he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference. >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley with every question and answer. nationwide is proud to join tavis in working with literacy. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: eight weeks from tomorrow, americans are l head to the polls in all 50 states in an election that could alter the balance of power in the house and senate and have an impact on the presidential campaign come 2012. i'm joined now by susan page, washington bureau chief of "u.s.a. today". she joins us tonight where where else, d.c. good to have you on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: fair or not fair to suggest this is one of the most closely watched midterms in a long time. >> it reminds me of 1994, clinton's midterm. there are some parallels which i know is a concern with the democr
>> susie: president obama says more needs to be done to boost the u.s. economy-- a lot more. >> the hole the recession left was huge, and progress has been painfully slow. millions of americans are still looking for work. >> tom: he defended his push for an extension of middle class tax cuts, and said extending tax cuts for the wealthy just doesn't make sense. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. "painfully slow." tom, those are the two words president obama used today to describe the pace of growth in the u.s. economy. and the economy was a big topic at his white house news conference this morning. >> tom: the other big topic, susie, was the president's announcement of his new top economic ad
from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, and thanks for joining us. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by my colleague suzanne pratt. gold prices have never been this high, suzanne, topping $1,277 an ounce in today's trading. >> suzanne: tom, gold's not the only metal shining on wall street. silver is at a 30-year high, closing at $20.82 an ounce. >> tom: been quite some rally, but the high prices metals are getting aren't scaring off buyers. as scott gurvey reports, the big rally in metals is expected to continue. >> reporter: five records in six weeks. it seems all that glitters on the futures exchanges are contracts in gold. analysts at goldman sachs, the royal bank of scotland and deutsche bank all published research notes making the case for the yellow metal today. analyst jim steel at h.s.b.c. says there are many reasons to expect the trend to continue. >> we still have a lot of financial market fragility, a lot of uncertainty about the economy going forward. we've had the reintroduction of quantitative easing, and we've also had a lot of
run? >> no, in fact it probably made the world situation and for us less safe. saddam hussein was despicable, he actually control the country and there was no doubt that there when he was in power because there would have been a threat to them. therefore, but the captor policy provided to iran and the control over terrorism in his own country was probably in a cold hearted national security way beneficial to us. not the other way around. he did not have weapons of mass destruction. since we had a good inspection system and he did not have weapons of mass destruction, for us, it was probably not a bad situation. it was terrible for the iraqi people. >> the concern for the iraqis is an incredible and asia. --amnesia. before the war, the clinton administration was attacked relentlessly. thousands of iraqis were dying because of the embargo, especially iraqi children, tens of thousands. if you want to make a tally of their losses, you have to remember what the situation was at the time. secondly, as the criteria of iraq never attacking us, they did not attack us and the gulf war e
, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> nationwide is on your side >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: winning of the award for lead actress in a comedy series, edie falco told the audience she was not funny. the former "sopranos" star took the emmy for a show that is sometimes funny and sometimes dark. >> i am off the clock. >> i don't mind. >> four minutes till brain damage. >> we need some help. >> i got it. [grunting] >> are you all right? tavis: fair to say this is a dark comedy? >> i think that is fair. [laughter] tavis: how the mix comedy with medicine? >> i just say the words. it is the riders that do it. tavis: what attracted you to it? >> i think jackie is funny. she is smar
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
for you, a new band of brothers as the u.s. troops surge in afghanistan peaks. those in the final deployment talk of their hopes and fears. r weast -- are we finally saying goodbye to the super-skinny model? hello to you. american citizens are being warned by the government to avoid a controversy. a church in florida plans to publicly burned the koran. there's a risk of terrorist response. the burning is planned to commemorate the september 11 attacks. president obama called it a stunt that would be a recruitment bonanza for al qaeda. indonesia's's president says images of the koran in flames could threaten world peace and damage relations between islam and the west. in india, and where the population of 130 million muslims, said such a and outrage should be prevented. it would inflame sentiments among muslims throughout the world and cause irreparable damage. noriega maliki -- nouri al maliki has responded. >> the plans of just one man in america have already provoked demonstrations. contactors burn an american flag to show how much they object to terry jones' plan to burn the ko
and burning the koran could harm the u.s. deeply abroad. that is the message president obama is pushing as he urges terry jones not to do it. the event was planned for saturday on the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. he is heeding criticism from the white house and one of the most senior generals. >> worrying signs, a possible gathering storm. the american pastor may have called off plans to bernie koran, but has not stopped -- burn the koran. this was jalal above earlier today. -- jalalabad earlier today. three demonstrators were shot by afghan security guards when they besieged the premier in the north of the country. in kabul, president karzai spoke out with a new warning to terry jones, that he should not think of carrying out his threat. >> any a front against the koran was a humiliation to muslims everywhere. , >> this prompted a new intervention on american television from general petraeus. >> there has been some damage done. you have heard of demonstrations here in afghanistan. they are already images implanted in the minds. >> this afternoon president obama weighed in again with more
. >> it insults muslims and bernie koran could also -- burning the koran could harm u.s. troops. the event was planned for saturday on the nine of -- anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. terry jones is getting criticism from the white house and fbi, but around the world there have already been protests. >> the president was forced to spend a rare news conference making an appeal for tolerance, saying muslims were neighbors and friends. the trouble is it looks as though he is getting more publicity to a group on the fringe. pastor jones is the leader of a church with a congregation of 50. he believes is what is the work of the devil and the threat and to burn korans. he said if forced muslims to abandon a plan to build a center on ground zero. >> we are still very hopeful that we will meet with the imam. >> it seems the koran burning will not happen. >> we are not at war against islam. we are at war against terrorist organizations. they have distorted islam or falsely used the banner of islam to engage in their destructive acts. >> and afghanistan, at the president's word has not been heard. pr
and the doubters. it george mitchell gave a good assessment after the first session of talks. >> all of us reaffirm our commitment to reaching a shared goal for the just, lasting, and lasting peace. >> -- proper peace. >> the issue that is sticking is the settlements. the palestinians are threatening to walk away unless there is no more settlements. the israelis say this is not possible. the prime minister is pinned in by a coalition pressing him not to give ground. how much progress is made on the issue has not emerged. the parties have sat together for two long sessions and will return to jerusalem for more talks tomorrow. so, no big announcements and the best anyone can hope for is that they are continuing. there will be many long hard days of communications and negotiation if this is to bear fruit. >> she has been held in solitary confinement for more than a year but today the u.s. female hiker was reported -- was released from iran. she and her companions were accused of spying. they insist that they got lost in iraq. according to her mother, she has been denied treatment for serious health pr
with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve of financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always pleased to have venus williams on the program. she is out with a new book about the intersection between sports and that success even for everyday people. the book is called "come to win,"and features essays from bill clinton, billie jean king, and so many more. venus is always welcome on this set because she designed the set. if you look closely every night in the credits, you will see a company called the star -- you will see v starr listed in the credits. she and her company designed a whole thing. seven years later, it is holding up. >> it is holding up. thank you for not changing at. tav
james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: i am pleased to welcome hugh laurie to this program. he continues his role on one of tv's most popular and you need from us, "house." the show does kick of it seventh season this week. airs every monday at 8:00 on fox. here now, a scene from "house." >> i want to move on, and i cannot. all i can think about is you. i just need to know if you and i can work. >> you think i can fix myself? >> i don't know. >> i am the most screwed up person in the world. >> i know. i love you. i wish i didn't. but i cannot help it. tavis: here lari, good to have the on the program, sir. -- hugh laurie, a bit too heavy on the program. while the clip was playing, you have them turn the
. and would indicate that it's going to take us quite a while before we get to full employment. >> susie: so if the economy grows 3.5% or more, as you're projecting, but the unemployment rate stays high, would you think that the fed has done its job? >> right now we're missing on both of our objectives. the inflation rate is too low and the unemployment rate is too high. so directionally i think it fairly clear which direction we should be moving. how much we should do and exact timing, that's a difficult question that requires a consensus, and that's why we have these meetings every six weeks. but it's clear right now that we're not where we want to be and we need to take some action to get there. >> susie: you can read the transcript of my entire interview with eric rosengren on our website. you'll find it on n.b.r. on pbs.org. >> tom: here are the stories in tonight's n.b.r. newswheel: stocks slipped. the dow fell 22 points, the nasdaq and the s&p 500 were both off about three points. trading volume was down a little on the big board from yesterday, but still over one billion shares. on t
>> susie: u.s. unemployment ticked higher last month, but the total number of jobs lost was not as bad as expected. even though nearly 15 million americans are looking for work, some companies still have a hard time filling open positions. >> tom: and many americans who once had careers in the fast lane are going in a new direction, working in the non- profit world. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 3. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. the unemployment rate now stands at 9.6%. tom, the labor department said 54,000 jobs were lost in august, facorting in census workers, but that number was lower than economists predicted. >> tom: susie, there were some encouraging signs. companies added 67,000 jobs to payrolls, the eighth straight month of job creation in the private sector. we have two stories, the specifics of th
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